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Significance of inner-self and orderliness

The purpose of the Holy Month of Ramadan is to instill in people qualities of loving and caring and the spirit of sacrifice (abstinence from food and drink from dawn to dusk, abstinence from sex throughout the month and offering alms to the poor).

Ramadan is also a time for introspection; to examine one’s inner-self and seek orderliness in one’s life and enliven conscience and compassion.

Those who do not follow the teachings of the Holy Quran are not true Muslims.

There is no plurality in Islam – there is but one God and the Prophet, his Messenger.

According to scholars, the Singularity denoted the singular purpose of being born as a human. Such Singularity forms the essence of every religion.

“The expression, ‘Oh My God!’ as an exclamation, as fear or even as surprise, symbolises that Singularity. Such ‘Oneness’ also forms the essence of Hinduism, although Hindus perceive God as God or Gods and as Goddesses,” the scholars say.

In giving shape, form and colour, Hindus venerate the Supreme Being with a ‘vision.’

But the essence of Hinduism is the same: God in one and is shapeless.

Islam does not prescribe (it actually proscribes) idol worship because it defeats the core of the Islamic belief that God has no shape or form.

Do Muslims worship the Kabah as they circumambulate in the Holy City of Makkah?

Experts in Islam say that Muslims do not worship the Kabah (they worship only the Almighty Allah). While going around the Kabah, they chant, La Illa Ha Ill-lal-ah (There is nothing worthy of worship except Allah).

Makkah is the centre of the globe, which is why all Muslims face towards the Holy City during prayers, irrespective of the country, city or the place from which they offer their submission to the Almighty Allah.

“The Kabah is for unifying Muslims at prayer. It would be chaotic if they prayed in any direction they chose,” an expert said.

Inborn discipline

Islamic countries follow strict code of conduct for Muslims and Non-Muslims during the Holy Month of Ramadan. The Arab Gulf brings forth fraternity, domestic and community unity with piety and dignity during his Month.

The spirit of oneness would also be experienced during Diwali and Christmas when Arab ministers, businesspersons and others would host parties in their homes or hotels, at which hundreds of people, including the rich and the ordinary, would be seen exchanging greetings, sharing food and sweets and enjoying the togetherness that these events brought with them.

I have lived and worked for organisations in many parts of the world but I believe that Bahrain and Bahrainis symbolised the teachings of Islam.

These teachings expected people to be honest, simple and pious; perform their mission in life: strengthen the fraternal bond, understanding and goodwill; and work towards what the Holy Quran and Prophet Mohammed directed every human being to do: foster love, peace and harmony.

My life and career in the Arab world helped me to understand the true spirit of Islam.

While the teachings of the Holy Quran directed Muslims to believe in one God, namely the Almighty Allah and bow to Him as the Most Gracious, the Most Benevolent and the Merciful, there was never a mention of condemnation of people of other faiths or the faiths themselves.

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