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Septuagenarian to pursue MBA qualification

Venkat Raman – 

venkat@indiannewslink.co.nz

The fact that education is a continuous process and that age is not a deterrent has been proved by another septuagenarian based in Auckland.

Academic, poet and writer Dr Mirza Mutiulla Baig Taimoori will shortly commence his studies leading to a qualification in Master of Business Administration (MBA).

“It is my long-cherished desire to obtain a degree in MBA,” he said.

Dr Taimoori however regrets his inability to take up a full-time assignment as a PhD scholar at the Aligarh University in Osmania on health grounds.

“Regretfully again, such Research is not available in Auckland and Aligarh University does not allow part-time students,” he said.

Earlier this year, Dr Taimoori received his postgraduate (MA) degree in Islamic Studies from Maulana Azad National University based in Hyderabad, India.

His other qualifications include postgraduate degree in Commerce (MCom) from Marathwada University, Aurangabad (1974), Philosophy (MPhil) from Madras University (1985), PhD in Commerce from Kakatiya University, Warangal (1992) and Diploma in Human Resources Management (HRM) from Kakatiya University (1994).

“The New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA) has approved these qualifications as similar to that of New Zealand,” Dr Taimoori said.

His teaching experience spans almost 30 years, 25 of which were for degree students and four years for students pursuing diploma courses.

He was elected twice to the Executive Committee of the Waitakere Ethnic Board (2008 to 2014) and President of Urdu Cultural Association of New Zealand (of which he is a Founder-Member) in 2007.

He has been Vice-President of the Association since 2010 and is currently an Islamic Volunteer.

His passion for Urdu encouraged him to establish the Hyderabad Urdu Cultural Association, which later dropped ‘Hyderabad’ to make it more ‘Sub-Continental’ to include people of Pakistani, Bangladeshi and Fijian origin.

“The launch of the Association should inaugurate a new chapter in the saga of cultural and social integration through a lingua franca spoken by almost a billion people and admired by several millions more in Asia, Australasia, Europe and North America,” Dr Taimoori said in a statement published by Indian Newslink.in its December 15, 2009 issue.

He had said that the need to encourage speaking in one’s native tongue at home cannot be over-emphasised.

“We live in a secular, cosmopolitan country where English is widely spoken and written in schools, offices and public places. But that does not mean we should forget our Mother language. Parents should encourage their children to learn their native language and speak it at home,” he said.

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