No ‘possible’ Indian candidate on New Zealand First List

New Zealand First Leader in his first Video advertisement called, ‘This is not our first rodeo’ (Screen Grab)

Venkat Raman
Auckland, September 16, 2023

The New Zealand First Party is unlikely to have any person of Indian origin in the 54th Parliament, in the absence of any candidate on what is called, ‘good ranking.’

Party Leader Winston Peters released the List of the Party’s candidates in the general election due to be held on October 14, 2023, almost simultaneously as the Election Commission published the full list of all the candidates of all political parties.

The names of candidates along with their Party affiliation and electorate can be found here.

Andy Foster, former Wellington Mayor has been included Seventh on the List, contesting the Mana seat in the Wellington Metropolitan area.

Mahesh Bindra, who has done one term as a List Member of the New Zealand First Party from 2014 to 2017 was conspicuous by his absence on the List.

Mr Peters had introduced him as the Party’s candidate for Otahuhu-Panmure at the Electionlink launch hosted by Indian Newslink on July 13, 2023 at Swaminarayan Complex in Papatoetoe, South Auckland. However, the electorate itself is missing from the Party’s List, suggesting that the omission of Mr Bindra would have been a last-minute change.

Anne Degia-Pala, the only candidate of Indian origin is 15th on the List and is unlikely to make it to Parliament based on the current polling of the Party just above the 5% threshold.

Mr Peters said that the Party had a large number of applicants keen on being on its List to contest in the ensuing general election.

“Our final selection for our list proves we have a wide range of highly qualified, skilled, and experienced New Zealanders who have put their hands up to represent our Party and New Zealand. This is the team that will give a voice for Kiwis who want some certainty, experience, and common sense back in Parliament,” he announced on his website this Morning.

Names of Candidates

Following is the full List of New Zealand First Party candidates: 1. Winston Peters (List) 2. Shane Jones (Northland) 3. Casey Costello (Port Waikato) 4. Mark Patterson (Taieri) 5. Jenny Marcroft (Kaipara Ki Mahurangi) 6. Jamie Arbuckle (Kaikōura) 7. Andy Foster (Mana) 8. Tanya Unkovich (Epsom) 9. David Wilson (Upper Harbour) 10. Erika Harvey (Tauranga) 11. Kirsten Murfitt (Bay of Plenty) 12. Lee Donoghue (Hutt South) 13. Stuart Husband (Waikato-Hauraki) 14. Gavin Benney (Whangārei) 15. Anne Degia-Pala (Kelston) 16. Robert Ballantyne (Rangitata) 17. Helma Vermeulen (Rangitīkei) 18. Laurie Turnbull (Napier) 19. Taylor Arneil (Wellington Central) 20. Keegan Langeveld (Dunedin) 21. Tira Pehi (Taupō) 22. Shane Wiremu (Christchurch East) 23. Mark Arneil (Christchurch Central) 24. Michelle Warren (Northcote) 25. Robert Monds (Papakura) 26. Kevin Stone (Hamilton West) 27. Jackie Farrelly (West Coast Tasman) 28. Geoff Mills (Rongotai) 29. Anthony Odering (Waitaki) 30. William Arnold (Whanganui) 31. Craig Sinclair (East Coast) 32. Russelle Knaapp (Hamilton East) 33. Lindsay Kirslake (Banks Peninsula) 34. Andrew Hogg (Maungakiekie) 35. Caleb Ansell (Coromandel).

New Zealand First Leader Winston Peters introducing some of his Party candidates at the Indian Newslink Electionlink launch on July 13, 2023 at Swaminarayan Complex in South Auckland (INL Photo by Narendra Bedekar)

Peters on  Co-Governance

Speaking at a campaign meeting in Howick, East Auckland, Mr Peters said that Labour may now be furiously trying to put Co-Governance on the backburner but they and sadly too many even in National, still believe in it and that the tenets of Co-Governance are based on a lie.

“They are saying that on February 5, 1840 (the day the Treaty of Waitangi was signed), when no one in the British Empire or indeed Britain was in partnership with the Queen, two days later, on the 7th of February, Maori were. The simple fact is that Maori ceded sovereignty to the Crown because, for years before 1840, they wanted law and order in their country – no matter how much the cultural Marxists want to try and re-write history,” he said.

According to him, in arguing partnership, they meant 50-50, even though the mass majority who claim to be Maori, and who claim to be speaking on behalf of all Maori, are not even half Maori themselves.

“By the 1975 Electoral Act definition of Maori, that is half Maori or more, they do not even amount to 6% of New Zealand’s population.  So, who are they really representing? And which part of their mixed DNA is going to compensate for the other part? Why cannot they answer that question?” Mr Peters said.

He said that New Zealand is a beneficiary of Western values, democracy, and the rule of law.

“The advancement and enhancement of those principles have only occurred in those societies that have united together as one people and who celebrate their nationhood instead of perpetuating division. With cooperation, conciliation, inclusivity and teamwork, our country can make it out of this crisis to a better future for every New Zealander. We can become again the envy of the world,” he said.

Anne Degia-Pala is the only Indian candidate on the NZ First Party List

The mess around us

Mr Peters is serious when he says that politicians are not masters but servants of the people.

“Too much of our country is in a right mess.  That is because the people who are suffering are not the ones who caused the mess.  Our once great society was built on hard work and a fair go for everyone.  Bold steps are needed to lift our country back to where it belongs.  Countries that do well, work well as a team, and everyone has a part to play,” he said.

Mr Peters’ political values are built on national collectivism on a national scale when he declared that his Party would help to rebuild our country for the many, not the few.

“We will reconstruct our economy for every New Zealander, not just a few over-mighty subjects.

That is our vision, that is our commitment, that is our commission,” he said.

Mr Peters said that the continued safety of our communities rests firmly on the capabilities and resourcing of the New Zealand Police.

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