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Music Academy opens three new branches

Venkat Raman
venkat@indiannewslink.co.nz

Encouraged by constant increase in the demand for learning Indian vocal and instrumental music, a popular singer and performer has announced the opening of three new branches in Auckland.

Sandhya Badakere, Principal & Director of ‘Swar Sadhna Music Academy’ (who will continue her classes from 56, White Swan Road, Mt Roskill) said that qualified and proficient teachers will train those keen on the ancient forms of Indian music at the three branches, two of which are located in West Auckland (New Lynn) and one in South Auckland (Papatoetoe).

Promoting music

“Swar Sadhana Music Academy has been overwhelmed by numerous enquiries from parents, students and even established singers wanting to enhance their vocal and musical skills. The three new branches will hopefully meet the growing needs. We will plan more branches in other areas of Auckland depending on the demand from students and availability of qualified teachers,” she said.

She said that the Academy has affiliation with Sur Jhankar Academy based in Mumbai, enabling students to achieve qualifications up to Diploma level, recognised by the Maharashtra government.

“The Academy focuses on promoting Indian music, develop local talent and provide grooming programmes for students with exceptional talents. We are proud that a number of our students have become performers at local shows and at programmes in which international artistes participate. Among them are Guncha Singh, Ravi Shetty, Kanik Mongia, Srishaa Iyer and Ritika Badakere,” Ms Badakere said.

Vibha Trivedi

Providing special training for beginners and children (from five years of age) is the forte of Vibha Trivedi, who has established the New Lynn branch of the Academy.

Adept in Hindustani Classical, Semi-Classical and Indian Folk, she has been a ‘special student’ of Ms Badakere for the past six years.

She has performed at Diwali and other festivals of local government and non-governmental organisations in New Zealand (Auckland and Christchurch) and Australia (Adelaide).

“Vibha evinced interest in music since her formative years and was a student of an institute in Vadodara affiliated to ‘Mumbai Magandharva.’ She was also trained in semi and light classical form from Rajendra Shah, a renowned musician. She believes that education is a continuous process and is keen to offer her best to students with commitment and dedication,” Ms Badakere said.

She can be contacted on (09) 8261217 or 021-1802247.

Mayuresh Tendulkar

Budding musicians and those seeking higher levels of professionalism in Hindustani Classical Music (Vocal), Voice Culture, Voice Production Techniques, Thumris and Ghazals would find Mayur Tendulkar an inspirational teacher.

Establishing the second branch of the Academy in New Lynn, he brings with him 12 years of training and expertise in the field. A student of the late Pandit Yeshwant Balakrishna Joshi (affectionately known as Yeshwantbua) of Gwalior and the late Shobha Gurtu, he is known to be an expert in all the areas of his teaching, including Khayal, Thumri, Dadra, Abhangs, Ghazals and other streams of Indian Classical Music.

“He has a holistic and patient approach to music training, along with assisted voice culture and rhythm training sessions, He carefully monitors the progress of each student,” Mrs Badakere said.

Mayuresh Tendulkar can be contacted on 021-02256503.

Ekta Kumar

Residents of South Auckland and East Auckland can take comfort in knowing that Ekta Kumar, another singer and teacher of proven efficiency, has established a branch of the Academy in Papatoetoe.

She will train anyone above 12 years of age in Hindustani Classical Vocal, Harmonium, Keyboard, Thumris, Ghazals., Voice Culture and Voice Production Techniques.

Her achievements include Merit Certificates in Music, Te Kanawa Cup (2010) for Excellence in Singing, status of Scholar at the South Auckland Choral Society, Level 7 in Western Classical Music (from Trinity College, London) and Degree in Performing Arts from Manukau Institute of Technology.

Ekta has appeared in a number of cultural and Hindi film music programmes in Auckland and has an audio CD and music video to her credit.

A student of Mrs Badakere for the past ten years, she has enriched not only the fineness of the Academy but also the teacher-student relationship.

She can be contacted on (09) 9503756 or 021-1492477; Email: ektak2006@yahoo.co.nz

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Photo Caption:

  1. Vibha Trivedi
  2. Mayuresh Tendulkar
  3. Ekta Kumar
  4. Students of Swar Sadhana Music Academy at their concert held on June 29, 2013
  5. Students of Swar Sadhana Music Academy at their concert held on August 9, 2015

 

From our Archives

Indian Newslink, March 1, 2008

An avenue to learn Hindustani music

Venkat Raman

Even as you enter the portals of the small but resonating classroom, the profundity of the environment overwhelms. And even as that ambience exhilarates, the sense of purpose dominates – to lift the quality and vicissitude of Hindustani Music to yet another seamless level and preserve its plurality of virtues to posterity.

And you recognise a few faces and voices there, apart from that of the accomplished and acclaimed Sandhya Rao, who, as the founder-director of Swar Sadhana Music Academy, has the unquenched ambition of imparting the nuances of Hindustani music to those with an ear and aptitude for it.

She is fortunate, for among the voices that are being fine-tuned at the academy belong to those heard often on stage – Ravi Shetty, Om Shriwastav and Pramith – voices that have reverberated the corridors of Bollywood.

But Ms Rao’s passion lies in propagating music that has stood the test of time, tantalising princes and plebeians alike.

Said she: “Swar Sadhana Music Academy would be serious and systematic in imparting knowledge among students who show promise and passion for Hindustani classical. Everyone begins at the entry level and progresses through tests and examinations. Piety and practice hold the key to individual success,” she said the other day, inviting a team of newly appointed members of her executive committee to taste the type of talent in the making.

Like Rome, musicians are not built in a day, she avers. “It takes years of training, rehearsing and attention to finer details. Music is part of our tradition and is revered with fear and anxiety. Nothing is more important than its preservation, to be bequeathed to the next generation,” Ms Rao said.

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