Multiethnic, multicultural show in aid of the disabled in Auckland

 

‘Durbar’ by Ragas of Devi at Dorothy Winstone Centre on November 12, 2022

Venkat Raman
Auckland, October 25, 2022

Asia, Europe, the Caribbean, Africa and the Middle East will converge with their culture and heritage in Auckland next month to provide a feast for the eyes and mullah for the wallet.

Ragas of Devi, a cultural organisation based in the city is organising a multicultural and multiethnic programme to navigate disabled people towards mainstream society.

The event, called, ‘Durbar,’ will be held from 6 pm at the Dorothy Winstone Centre at the Auckland Girls Grammar School complex located at 16 Howe Street in Freeman’s Bay.

About Durbar

Devi Sobhana, Director and Principal of Ragas of Devi said that ‘Durbar’ (which can be interpreted as a public domain) said that the entertainment programme will comprise cultural items from various parts of the world.

“This will include India’s Bharata Natyam, Bollywood Dance, Carnatic and Hindustani Vocal and Kathak, Brazilian Samba, Cuban Salsa, Egyptian Theatre (Belly Dance), Irish Drums, Maori Taonga Puoro and South African Flute. There will also be folklore representing many cultures. This programme will highlight the richness of cultures and talent inherent in our communities. We have many facets to our traditions but we are one people,” Devi said.

While Classical Dance and Music will conform to the culture and tradition of India, Bollywood and fusion numbers will be a collaboration of the East and the West. The folklore segment will be unique and the Maori, Middle East, South American and South African items will also add value to the theme and purpose of the evening, she added.

Training Centres for the Disabled

Devi has sought the support of commercial and community organisations and individuals for donations and sponsorships since a part of the proceeds of the event have been earmarked to support intellectually (autistic) and physically challenged persons.

Ragas of Devi proposes to purchase the materials (such as timber, paint and tools) used by disabled trainees at these Centres, enabling them to save money.

Devi said that a visit to the Vocational Training Centre for the Disabled led to the realisation that community work and support should include people with special needs.

“I have seen both physically and intellectually challenged persons trained appropriately at such Centres to achieve mainstream skills as part of the New Zealand Enabling Good Lives Principles. I have seen the passion of trainers and trainees but public awareness needs to be raised so that trainees can be properly employed. Since then, I have tried to support disabled people in every way possible. I decided to dedicate ‘Durbar’ to them,” she said.

She said that as well as those connected with Ragas of Devi and volunteers, have been helping her to put together the programme, which she said will appeal to all communities.

Devi Sobhana and her associates at Ragas of Devi are ardent supporters of arts and artists. They constantly search for people with talent in our communities and provide them with a platform to give vent to their passion.,

Durbar is the first in a series to promote Devi’s journey and her decision to contribute to a community and social cause embellishes her objectives. She believes that the initiative will not only preserve and promote various cultures but also enrich them.

About Ragas of Devi

Music has been a passion since her formative years but Devi Sobhana began formal training in Carnatic Music when she was ten years old. Her Gurus not only imparted art to their enthusiastic students but also taught her to encourage and promote art wherever and whenever the opportunity arose anywhere in the world.

She registered Ragas of Devi as a Company and started a Facebook Page in 2019 to promote and popularise Indian Classical Music, especially Carnatic Music. She started posting short Carnatic Krithis and used to render impromptu singing. Her short notes and talks on the associated Raga began to evince the interest increasing number of people. Her ability to demonstrate the handling of Ragas in film songs attracted even wider interest.

Devi Sobhana: Music to fill the soul and serve communities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Her voice went on air in 2020 as she was accorded an opportunity to sing on Radio Macfast (90.4 FM) broadcast from Thiruvila in Kerala. The weekly programme, called, ‘Ragalayam’ aims to introduce various Raags employed in Carnatic and Hindustani music formats.

She organised the first public programme in 2021 to improve public awareness of family violence and its adverse effects on the well-being and mental health of victims including women and children. Held under the theme, ‘Shakti,’ the programme displayed different stages of a woman’s life through music and dance.

“My objective is to create awareness of the vast ocean of Indian Ragas and how they are deep-rooted to any music that we hear from across the world. The group was named ‘Ragas of Devi’ towards the fulfilment of this objective. Durbar is the second in line themed around diversity,” Devi said.

Tickets for Durbar can be purchased at
https://www.eventfinda.co.nz/2022/ragasofdevi-presents-durbar/auckland/freemans-bay/tickets

 

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