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Home-grown talent glorifies Nayyar-Mohan spirit

Venkat Raman – 
venkat@indiannewslink.co.nz

Flashing lights, strobes and high sound may be the modern mode of entertainment, especially with so-called international stars, but no one seems to care that these would imperil the vision and hearing of our children and their succeeding generations.

We hope medical practitioners, social and community workers and others in the know would encourage our youngsters to take to soft, lilting melodies such as the one experienced at Dorothy Winstone Centre, Auckland Girls Grammar School on Saturday, May 21, 2016.

Credit to Swar Sadhana

Swar Sadhana Academy of Indian Music and its Director & Principal Sandhya Bedekar deserve credit for organising ‘Sunehri Yaadein’ with an impressive selection of songs composed by the Late O P Nayyar and Madan Mohan. The two maestros have left behind a timeless and delectable banquet of songs that will hopefully inspire our young men and women as much as they did during our youthful years.

There were 31 songs in all, rendered by our own young and old singers, adding meaning to the belief that there is ample talent within our communities.

An important, rich member of the Indian community, who quietly promotes a number of charitable projects once said, “I would rather pay $500 and be amidst an audience that appreciates talent in New Zealand, rather than go to a noisy show of singers and musicians of the Hindi film industry. Our authorities should take a serious look at the health hazards that some of the shows pose to our people.”

Auspicious beginning

‘Sunehri Yaadein’ commenced with a rendition of a Ganesha Stuthi in Choir format, bringing out the significance of invoking the Blessings of ‘Remover of all obstacles’ and the ability of the group of singers to strike a good note of harmony.

Ms Badakere herself was in her elements after her first song. As she rendered ‘Mai Re Mai Kaise Kahoon,’ we could visualise the number picturised on Rehana Sultana for ‘Dastak’, a film considered rather bold in 1970. Madan Mohan’ composition was impeccable as was the voice of Lata Mangeshkar.

A number of songs stood out at ‘Sunehri Yaadein.’ Among them were ‘Milo Na Tum to Hum Ghabraye,’ rendered by Srishaa Iyer (original by Lata Mangeshkar for ‘Heer Ranjha’ released in 1970), ‘Lakhon Hai Nigahon Main’ by Ashish Ramakrishnan (taken from ‘Phir Wohi Dil Laya Hoon’ 1963) and ‘Ek Manzil Rahi Do Phir Pyar Na Kaise Ho’ by Ravi and Guncha Singh (taken from the 1961 film ‘Sanjog’). ‘Who Bhooli Dastan Lo Phir Yaad Aagayi’ (from the same film) was a difficult song which Ritika Badakere presented with poise and serenity, proving that she is the chip of the old block.

Master strokes

Neel Patel was confident as he rendered the title track from ‘Tumsa Nahin Dekha.’ Shammi Kapoor’s songs were the master strokes of Mohammed Rafi who remains inimitable but our singers have time and again proved their growing competence.

Rachit Bhatia, lifted the spirit of the evening when he brought ‘Ye Hai Bombay Meri Jaan’ (from ‘CID’ released in 1956 with O P Nayyar as the Music Director).

Guncha drew wide applause as she brought back memories of Madhubala on who ‘Aaiye Meherbaan’ was picturised for ‘Howrah Bridge’ released in 1958.

Other songs of note were ‘Teri Aankhon Ke Siva’ by Ashish and Ritika (from ‘Chirag’), ‘Aye Dil Mujhe Bata De’ by Vibha Trivedi (‘Bhai Bhai’), and ‘Aap Ki Nazro Ne Samjha’ by Guncha (‘Anpadh’).

The Artistes

Singers: Following is the complete list of singers at Sunehri Yaadein: Arun Khotkar, Ashish Ramakrishnan, Ekta Kumar, Guncha Singh, Joseph Moolam, Kanika Diesh, Mayuri Bhole, Neel Patel, Rachit Bhatia, Ritika Badakere, Sandhya Badakere, Srishaa Iyer and Vibha Trivedi.

They were supported by Ekta Kumar, Hemant Thaker (Keyboards), Joscel Alexander (Acoustic Drums), Joseph Alexander (Electronic Drums and Octopad), Peter Ravela (Dholak), Ravi Shah (Guitar), Shivan Padayachi (Bass Guitar) and Vivek Anturkar (Tabla).

A Memo to Sandhya Badakere: Please restrict conversation with artistes to one single session; not after every song.

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