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Demand for skilled trade rising

Auckland, August 20, 2016

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Industry group identifies sectors most in need

Got A Trade Week returns to schools and communities this Monday 22 August to raise awareness of careers that exist in 140 trades and services in New Zealand. The Week, being held from 22-26 August, will celebrate the talents and achievements of Kiwi apprentices making headway in their vocation, and focus on the future demand expected for skilled workers across all trades and services.

Got A Trade Week chair, Andrew Robertson says New Zealand’s skills shortage is real and needs to be urgently addressed if the economy is to keep buoyant into the future.

“The national campaign will promote New Zealand’s need for more skilled people in trades and services. According to 2015 Immigration NZ data, one third of the occupations on the Long-Term Skills Shortage List are trades and services. There is a worrying trend of major shortfalls being predicted and by 2020 there will be high demand for employment created by industry growth and replacement demand across all sectors,” says Mr Robertson.

A sample of trades and services that will require more workers in four years’ time:

Trade/Service Demand in 2020
Accommodation 11800
Aged Care/Support Workers 17500
Automotive 11200
Building & Construction 64000
Civil 19600
Electro-Technology 11300
Hairdressing 2700
Mechanical Engineering 5400
Manufacturing 40000
Plumbing, Gas fitting and

Drain-laying

7800
Resource Recovery 2800
Retail Supply Chain 107200
Roofing & Scaffolding 6800

“There are genuine and exciting career opportunities in over 140 trades and services for young people who are willing to ‘earn and learn’. We encourage everyone to visit gotatrade.co.nz and take a good look at the tremendous opportunity these viable career paths offer,” Mr Robertson adds.

Got A Trade Week 2016 speaks to school leavers, as well as parents and teachers. More than 75,000 young New Zealanders aged 15-24 years are not currently working, studying or training, accounting for 41 per cent of the country’s unemployed. They are not developing the skills they need to compete in the workforce.

“Only 28% of school leavers go to university. Got A Trade Week is about showcasing the opportunities that exist out there for the other 72 per cent,” says Mr Robertson.

“Trades and services typically refer to jobs that require practical skills and on-the-job training. This includes everything from construction, engineering and transport, to hairdressing, hospitality, aged care workers and retail. There are hundreds of roles to choose from and long-term career prospects for young people who are keen to work and willing to learn. This is an important conversation for jobseekers, for educators and for whanau.

“We all need to work together – in the home and in the classroom – to steer our kids in the direction of real job opportunities and to ensure NZ’s industries can survive.”

Got A Trade Week 2016

22 August: Official Launch at The Grand Hall, Parliament

25 August: Future Business Leaders Forum -Auckland. Providing New Zealand’s ‘bright young things’ in trades and services with the tools to further their careers.

25 August: The Edge Got a Trade Future Business Leaders Awards – Auckland. Female, Maori and Pasifika and General categories.

October: ATEED Got a Trade Speed meet. Connecting school leavers with prospective employers in New Zealand’s trades and services.

Got A Trade Week is organised by the country’s industry training organisations representing more than 140 trades and services.

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