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Deities exemplify Shirdi Saibaba Temple

Almost ten years ago, writing in our November 1, 2003 issue, Sunkari Laxman, Founder-President of Shirdi Saibaba Sansthan of New Zealand Inc, said that the most cherished desire of devotees was to construct a Temple for Saibaba.

“They have undertaken a project to construct a Temple in Auckland funds for which are being mobilised. As Sai Baba said, ‘My tomb shall bless and speak to the needs of the devotees.’ One of the main objectives of the Sansthan is to build a Sai Baba Temple in Auckland, in aid of which the Sansthan is conducting various fund raising programmes,” he had said.

No one including Mr Laxman, who is now a member of the Executive Committee, was aware of the magnificence and magnitude of the Temple that is now nearing completion in Onehunga. None knew that the Project would cost at least $6 million and that the generosity of supporters would be overwhelming.


Strategic Location

Located at 12 Princess Street, the Temple Complex, occupying freehold land area of about 2975 Sq Metres (and built-in area of 3685 Sq Metres), will incorporate a number of modern facilities and amenities to serve the interests of the community and the society in a larger sense.

The current Executive Committee, led by President Hari Gangisetty, Vice-President Shivani Arora and Secretary Hameed Mohammed, has reason to be gratified with the prospect of the official opening on or about November 13, 2013, subject to satisfactory completion of jobs at hand.

“The Executive Committee in general and those in charge of the Temple Project in particular, have been working hard to comply with official formalities and obtain final approvals from the concerned authorities,” they said.

Great Statues

One of the most exciting aspects of the Temple Project is the installation of the Deities, each of which was created as per specifications in India.

Of these, the main Deity of Shirdi Saibaba is the tallest at about 5.5 feet.

“The life-size Statue was specially carved for our Sanstan in Makarana Marble in spotless white in Jaipur, India. Moving the idol from storage to the first floor of the Temple Hall was a major challenge,” Mr Mohammed said.

Among the other Deities made of White Makarana Marble are Lord Ganesha, Lord Hanuman, Mata Chowki (Goddess Durga or Mahishasura Mardhini), Radha & Krishna, Dattatreya and Ram Dharbar (all about 3.5 feet).

The Temple will also be adorned by the Deities of Lord Venkateswara (Balaji), Goddess Padmavati and Shiva Linga in Black Granite (42” in height).

The main Prayer Hall will accommodate the Navagrahas (Nine Planets) of 18 inches, made in Black Granite.

Gita discourses

“Pending the formal opening, we have organised daily discourses on Bhagavad Gita.

The discourses, called, ‘Shrimad Bhagwat Katha,’ are being delivered from October 14 to 26, 2013 between 6 pm and 9 pm by Swami Nalinanand Giri at the Sai Community Centre within the new Temple Complex in Onehunga.

Mrs Arora said that the nightly discourses will guide people to eternal peace in a world of sorrows, miseries and stress.

“Shrimad Bhagwat Katha will awaken the soul, enable people to apprise their consciousness and lift themselves in thought and spirit in the enlightened presence of Swami Nalinanand Giri,” she said.

The visiting Monk is stated to be the spiritual descendant of a great saintly and scholarly family of Patiala in Punjab, India.

Swami Nalinanand Giri is just 33 years of age and is hailed as a self-realised master, who radiates brilliance and spiritual enlightenment.

“He is helping mankind to come out of material desires to enjoy and relish the nectar of divinity. The discourses will include Pravachan, Divine Bhajan and Aarti at the end of which, Maha Prasad will be served,” Mr Gangisetty said.*

Photo Gallery on the right side column:

Lord Ganesha

Goddess Durga or Mahishasura Mardini

Shirdi Saibaba

Swami Nalinanand Giri

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