Posted By

Tags

Summer in Aotearoa Becoming Hotter

Fun in the sun (Photo: Our Auckland)

Dr Malini Yugendran

16 January 2023

Temperatures are rising in Aotearoa making this summer hotter than the past two years. The National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) reported the overall temperature in New Zealand rose by a “significant” 0.2 degrees Celsius in 2022.

Rising temperature (photo: Laidbackgardener)

The increase made New Zealand witness its hottest and wettest winter since 2018. 2023 is likely to follow the current pattern of hot and humid weather.  NIWA reports that temperatures in Northland, Auckland, Waikato, and the Bay of Plenty will be “above average” this summer. New Zealanders will be experiencing “above average warmth, especially at night, and humidity at times,” stated NIWA.  Indian Newslink spoke to a New Zealand registered nutritionist, Mallika Janakiraman, and Auckland-based naturopath Sandhya Govind on how to keep cool this summer.

Coconut water is best to beat the heat (Photo: India.com)

Foods to beat the heat

Summer is a great time to explore the outdoors. There are beautiful beaches and coastal areas that New Zealand has to offer where one can enjoy activities such as swimming, sunbathing, and water sports like surfing, kayaking, and snorkelling. Hiking and camping are also common recreational activities during summer. New Zealand’s national parks and nature reserves, offer walking tracks and trails that take in some of the country’s most beautiful scenery. Ms Govind, a naturopath, said that “the temptation to stay outdoors for long periods to enjoy the warm sunshine and longer days may sometimes lead to overexposure resulting in easily treatable conditions like heat rash to more serious conditions like heat exhaustion and heat stroke.” Both Ms Govind and Ms Janakiraman resounded that hydration is vital for optimal health because it regulates body temperature, lubricates joints, fights infections, provides nutrients to cells, and keeps organs functioning efficiently. Ms Janakiraman, a nutrition adviser at nutri360, suggests that we “hydrate with water, coconut water with no additives, lassi, or Gulkand (rose petals).” Ms Janakiraman said that “coconut water is helpful because it contains healthy fats, potassium, and other minerals.” Ms Govind explained that “when we sweat a lot in the heat, our bodies lose electrolytes. Electrolytes are minerals such as sodium, calcium, potassium, and magnesium that help balance the amount of water in the body. Coconut water helps replace lost electrolytes and keep us hydrated.” According to Ayurveda, buttermilk (lassi) is a cooling beverage that assists digestion and excretion. Gulkand, a sweet rose petal preserve, is supposed to help with acid reflux, gastritis, skin irritation, indigestion, ulcers and nosebleeds, and stress.

Other foods that Ms Janakiraman suggests, include “whole grain or millet porridge (ragi, barley etc) diluted with water or yoghurt, seasonal fruits, and vegetables. Golden or green kiwis are very high in vitamin C and assist in digestion.” Ms Govind suggests that we also include “watermelon, oranges and other citrus fruits, and cucumbers since they contain water, antioxidants, minerals, and electrolytes.”

Citrus fruits to keep you hydrated (Photo: emedihealth)

Ms Govind says that “it is advisable to avoid alcohol as it is a diuretic (increases urine production) and can also deplete the body of electrolytes.”

Ms Janakiraman said that it is vital to have “direct exposure to the sun for at least 6 to 8 minutes to receive adequate 1000 IU of Vitamin D. However, use sun protection between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. when the sun is at its harshest. Outdoor activities are best done in the early morning or late afternoon,” she explained.

Paws of Fury: The Legend of Hank (Photo: This and that with Olivia)

Chill in Tāmaki Makaurau

Summer is also a time for many festivals and events throughout New Zealand, including music, arts, and cultural festivals. And Tāmaki Makaurau (Auckland) has many events for this summer.

Auckland Council’s free summer concert series is back for its 45th season and promises a load of entertainment.  Every weekend, there are one or two concerts. Head north this weekend to Sunburst Reserve, Sunburst Avenue, Snells Beach for music by   Coco-Rocky, Crimson Layne and guests, from 1 to 4 p.m. on 21 January 2023. For more information about Music in the Parks, do visit their webpage.

Summer also means Movies in the Parks. Bring the whole whānau (family) with a picnic basket and rug and settle down as the sun goes down for some Hollywood hits that include animated movies and blockbusters. Paws of Fury: The Legend of Hank will be playing on Friday 27 January at Randwick Park, Manurewa after sundown at about 8.45 pm. Minions: The Rise of Gru will be screened on Saturday 28 January at Fergusson Domain, Onehunga after sundown at about 8.45 pm.  Both shows start with pre-movie entertainment from 6.45 pm Visit their webpage for more information on their monthly movies.

Minions: The Rise of Gru (Photo: The Movies DB)

Plan your own artistic journey around Auckland with its public art website. Auckland has over 400 public artworks, so put on your walking shoes, bring your camera, and start clicking away this summer.

Overall, New Zealand’s summer season offers a wide range of activities and attractions for you to enjoy with your whānau.

Dr Malini Yugendran is an Indian Newslink Reporter based in Auckland.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Share this story

Related Stories

Indian Newslink

Previous slide
Next slide

Advertisement

Previous slide
Next slide

Advertisement

Previous slide
Next slide

Advertisement

Previous slide
Next slide

Advertisement

Previous slide
Next slide

Advertisement

Previous slide
Next slide

Advertisement

Previous slide
Next slide

Advertisement

Previous slide
Next slide

Advertisement

Previous slide
Next slide

Advertisement

Previous slide
Next slide

Advertisement